Hot Labor Day weekend ahead; Safety on the water comes first

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As we go into the Labor Day weekend, it is important to emphasize supervision and swim safety while spending time with friends and family around the pool.

WATER SAFETY

  • There Is No Substitute for Active Supervision
  • Actively supervise children in and around open bodies of water, giving them your undivided attention.
  • Whenever infants or toddlers are in or around water, an adult should be within arm’s reach to provide active supervision. We know it’s hard to get everything done without a little multitasking, but this is the time to avoid distractions of any kind. If children are near water, then they should be the only thing on your mind. Small children can drown in as little as one inch of water.
  • When there are several adults present and children are swimming, use the Water Watcher card strategy, which designates an adult as the Water Watcher for a certain amount of time (such as 15-minute periods) to prevent lapses in supervision. Download a WaterProofFLWater Watcher card here.

Have young children and inexperienced swimmers wear a Coast Guard-approved life jacket.
Protect the neck – don’t dive headfirst. Walk carefully into open waters.
Keep a close eye and constant attention on children and adults while at the beach. Wave action can cause someone to lose their footing, even in shallow water.
Watch out for aquatic life. Water plants and animals may be dangerous. Avoid patches of plants and leave animals alone.

SUN PROTECTION

Limit exposure to direct sunlight between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., and wear a broad-spectrum sunscreen with a protection factor of at least 15. Reapply sunscreen often. Remember to drink plenty of water regularly, even if not thirsty. Avoid drinks with alcohol or caffeine in them. Protect the eyes by wearing sunglasses that will absorb 100 percent of UV sunlight. Protect the feet – the sand can burn them and glass and other sharp objects can cut them.

During hot weather, watch for signs of heat stroke—hot, red skin; changes in consciousness; rapid, weak pulse; rapid, shallow breathing. If it’s suspected someone is suffering from heat stroke:

Call 9-1-1 and move the person to a cooler place.
Quickly cool the body by applying cool, wet cloths or towels to the skin (or misting it with water) and fanning the person.
Watch for signs of breathing problems and make sure the airway is clear. Keep the person lying down.

GRILLING SAFETY

Every year people in this country are injured while using backyard charcoal or gas grills. Follow these steps to safely cook up treats for the backyard barbecue:

  • Always supervise a barbecue grill when in use.
  • Never grill indoors – not in your house, camper, tent, or any enclosed area.
  • Make sure everyone, including the pets, stays away from the grill.
  • Keep the grill out in the open, away from the house, the deck, tree branches, or anything that could catch fire.
  • Use the long-handled tools especially made for cooking on the grill to keep the chef safe.
  • Never add charcoal starter fluid when coals have already been ignited.
  • Always follow the manufacturer’s instructions when using grills.

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